Top 10 Stinky Cheeses in the World

    Only something as delicious as cheese could get away with smelling like a pair of dirty socks. Here at HotelClub, we figure this is worth celebrating. So, don your gas masks as we showcase the world’s top 10 stinky cheeses.

    1. Pont l’Eveque
    Pont l’Eveque may be the smelliest cheese on our list, but it’s also one of the tastiest. This French delicacy is one of the oldest-known types of cheese, dating back to the 13th century. This is the kind of food you want to keep wrapped-up in the fridge, unless you want everything else to smell like old socks. If you can’t handle its pungent odour, all you have to do is remove the moist crust.

    2. Camembert de Normandy
    Some would argue that Camembert de Normandy smells like the secret project of a chemical company. Despite its stench, Camembert is loved the world over for its soft, runny texture. Made from unpasteurised cow’s milk and left to mature for three weeks, its normally eaten with a spoon. It’s now a subject of a war between the small traditional producers and the country’s industrial dairies who want to use pasteurised milk instead of raw milk.

    3. Munster
    This French cheese is often called ‘Monster Cheese’ due to its unbearable odour. It comes from the French region of Alsace where it’s produced from raw cow’s milk and left to mature in damp cellars. A three months-aged Munster is not something you want to punish your nose with; its smell has been compared with sweaty feet. Mmmm, tasty.

    4. Epoisses
    One of Napoleon’s favourites, Epoisses is one of the smelliest cheeses on the cheese board. Indeed, Epoisses has been banned from public transportation vehicles all over France. It is made from raw cow’s milk and its rind is washed with pomace brandy. If it starts to smell too strongly of ammonia (or someone who hasn’t showered in a week), you should throw it away because it’s no longer edible. Bon appetite!

    5. Brie de Meaux
    Forget pasteurised Brie; we’re talking about the real deal here – original, raw cow’s milk Brie. It’s a very creamy cheese that’s covered by a thick, white-mould crust (which true cheese connoisseurs say should be eaten rather than thrown away). The French swoon over Brie de Meaux, but if your nose is ammonia-sensitive you don’t want to get too close, especially if it has been left to mature too long.

    6. Roquefort
    One of the most sought-after cheeses on the planet, Roquefort is produced out of raw sheep’s milk and matured in caves around the small village of Roquefort, Southern France. Although it’s known as the ‘King of Cheeses’, many people are too chicken to try it due to its stinky odour and blue mould.

    7. Limburger
    No, it’s not a type of hamburger. Mainly produced in Germany, Limburger is perhaps the most popular of all smelly cheeses. It’s fermented using a bacterium that’s partly responsible for the smell of the human body. As a result, when people say Limburger smells like human feet, they are scientifically correct. If you can handle its stench long enough to have a bite, you’ll realise this German delicacy is quite tasty.

    8. Stinking Bishop
    Not to be confused with a bishop who hasn’t showered in a week, Stinking Bishop is seriously good soft cheese from Britain. Dating back to the time of the Cictercian monks, it’s produced out of pasteurised Gloucestershire cow’s milk and then washed with Stinking Bishop Pear juice. The smell is just in the rind though and once removed, a soft and delicious cheese is revealed.

    9. Blue Stilton
    While on the topic of British cheeses, you can’t go past Blue Stilton. Known by some as the ‘King of English cheeses’, it’s worth trying if you subscribe to “the smellier the better” school. The texture varies from hard and crumbly to very soft, almost butter-like, depending on how mature it is. The older the cheese, the softer and smellier it is.

    10. Taleggio
    What it lacks in good looks, Taleggio makes up for in taste. Unlike most stinky cheese, this one doesn’t smell so bad. Appreciated for its strong taste and soft texture, this Italian cheese dates back to the 10th century when its makers left it in caves to mature and washed it with saltwater-soaked sponges.

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    126 comments on “Top 10 Stinky Cheeses in the World”

    1. Alex says on February 21, 2011 at 10:38 am:

      Real Limburger is not made in Germany but in Aubel, Belgium.

    2. eileen says on February 23, 2011 at 11:37 pm:

      agree – danish port salut is very very smelly. i love stinky cheese and eat a lot of it but this cheese is disgusting!

    3. Paul Bridgland says on June 9, 2011 at 5:31 pm:

      Top 10 stinky cheeses of the world … all of them delicious – just received 2 Kg of Gamle Ole – should be on the list!
      http://t.co/twoq8FO

    4. Joe de Melun says on June 22, 2011 at 6:39 pm:

      Brie de Melun is better, and stronger-tasting and -smelling, then Brie de Meaux. Montereau and Nangis are good too. Meaux is considered the Schlitz of Bries here in the Brie, where I’ve lived for 20 years.

    5. maralenenok says on June 30, 2011 at 7:40 pm:

      I read this and now I really, really want cheese. http://t.co/AFCLTFK My kingdom for some brie.

    6. Ameree K says on July 6, 2011 at 2:34 am:

      @TheZachMills @Daniellesph Munster Cheese?! http://t.co/sk43eGU

    7. Danielle Sindelar says on July 6, 2011 at 2:37 am:

      @TheZachMills @Daniellesph Munster Cheese?! http://t.co/sk43eGU

    8. Romke Soldaat says on August 31, 2011 at 6:52 am:

      G+: Six of them are French (Top 10 Stinky Cheeses in the World) http://t.co/4Z5n5pi

    9. Pieter Bloem says on August 31, 2011 at 8:12 am:

      Tried and really enjoyed Lincet Epoisse in its home town Of Saligny, Bourgogne.Didnt smell as bad as described here.Thanks Auntie Janine and cousins Johan and Marie,and Arnold for the tasting.Wished we could get some here in New Zealand

    10. John Curtas says on September 3, 2011 at 6:23 pm:

      Top 10 Stinky Cheeses in the World – http://t.co/WBasoXR

    11. Clear Quality says on September 15, 2011 at 8:09 pm:

      RT @hotelclub: Top 10 Stinky Cheeses in the World http://t.co/6oFPwR7t

    12. Jerry says on September 17, 2011 at 1:03 pm:

      The author apparently doesn’t know many cheeses. Some of these develop a strong smell only when they are old – and then there are others that would definitely beat any brie, camembert or the Stilton. Just some examples: Danish Havarti and Esrom, German Harzer, Tilsiter of any origin, many French soft cheeses. Coiuldn’t possibly list nor let alone know them all. But the list in the article is poorly researched.

    13. The cheese taster says on September 28, 2011 at 12:04 am:

      I have been living and travelling throughout France for 6 months now and have tried local cheeses everywhere I’ve been, and trust me, I have done 11,000kms with my car thus far. I don’t know about other countries (although you can’t beat the French in the variety and tradition/art of making cheese) but I have to agree with Maroilles cheese, it is the worst smelling cheese I have encountered so far even when it’s fresh. But don’t be put off by its formidable pungent odour… it tastes so good when cooked!!! Try baking salmon with maroilles (my friend’s dad recipe) you don’t need any condiments. It tastes like heaven :)

      I think the french are kind of immune to the strong cheese odours, I think they are so used to it that they even like it and some even rate the quality of the cheese by its smell. But even my french friend has admitted that maroilles does stink. lol

      Reblochon is also particularly pungent but also delicious, specially in “Tartiflette” (and not “raclette” -which is another type of cheese- like someone sugested earlier). As far as Rochefort (or blue vein cheese) I really like the smell and of course the taste.

      But now that I think of it, Pont l’Eveque smells pretty bloody rank…even after I removed it from the fridge (my friend has at least 3 or 4 types of cheeses at any given time and unfortunately for me this was one of them) there was this very distinct unpleasant odour coming out as soon as you opened the fridge door…Pont L’Eveque has to be one of the only cheeses I don’t like! So at least the author of this article got one right.

      And just to reply to some comments because I have nothing better to do right now: Reblochon is used in “Tartiflette”, Raclette is a Swiss cheese but very popular in the French Alps, Gruyere actually smells delicious!,I have never seen anyone eating camembert with a spoon either but it’s a great idea!! and I’m intrigued about Livarot, haven’t tried it yet.

    14. Rodders, Peterborough says on October 3, 2011 at 8:27 pm:

      Any ‘strong’ blue cheese requires keeping at the back of the fridge for 2 – 3 months after it’s ‘best before date’ to allow it to mature, and gain a little fragrance & pungentcy. You cannot eat that sort of cheese when it’s hard & crumbly. It’s just bland!! – It has to be given time to age & become ‘spreadable’. A nice Stilton round, aged for 6 months past it’s ‘sell by date’ in the fridge (double wrapped in clingfilm), then given a couple of hours to get up to room temperature, is absolute nectar (works equally well with the likes of St. Agur/ Roquefort/ Camembert etc., although I wouldn’t turn my nose up at any of the cheeses mentioned above. I do like Pont L’Eveque, again kept for a while. Works well with a strong ‘English’ Cheddar as well!!(Don’t mind any mould – just cut the rind off!!) A good cheese, whatever it’s origin, deserves to be eaten at room temperature, together with a crusty bread or dry biscuits, and a nice red wine…… Can’t beat it!!!

    15. Where Is My Mouse And Why… | OH, SOPHIA… says on October 11, 2011 at 3:35 pm:

      [...] said it’s important that the food has a certain smell to attract my little friend, so I chose smelly cheese and some [...]

    16. Veronica Steele says on November 5, 2011 at 9:02 am:

      Our Irish Milleens would enjoy such illustrious companions and could give some of them a run for their money, in a friendly, sporting way of course.

    17. karensomers says on May 12, 2012 at 6:31 pm:

      Anyone heard of one called Ambassador ? my Mum was German not sure if a German cheese . She got thrown off the bus it smelt so bad .

    18. Mark says on June 23, 2012 at 3:09 pm:

      I don’t understand how anyone here who has had a Pont l’Eveque cheese in their house could say it doesn’t have a strong smell! I’ve bought it several times whilst in France and even straight out of the supermarche chiller it stinks the car out totally by the time you have got back through customs to England! I love the creamy taste of it, but my ex actually did force me to keep it in a sealed box in the garden in the end as every time you opened the fridge the entire ground floor of the house smelt terrible!

    19. Motty Levi says on August 17, 2012 at 7:54 pm:

      Sorry, but your blog is not on stinking cheese, but on really delicious cheeses. Cambembert stinks??? Taleggio stinks??? Please, admit of not having the slightest idea about really stinking cheese! :-)

    20. John Burridge says on April 12, 2013 at 1:53 pm:

      Whatever happened to that delightfully and uniquely stinky American cheese called Liederkranz? I have not seen it in years, much to my chagrin.

    21. Greg says on April 18, 2013 at 3:50 pm:

      I agree with the Tilsit commenters. Athletic trainers could use this stuff to revive unconscious boxers and football players.

    22. Graeme says on May 16, 2013 at 8:53 pm:

      Livarot, for sure, of the more easily available fromages ought be here. My first encounter, visiting my brother in Normandie, was asking whether the poodle across the cafe had defecated. Within minutes I’d tasted and was hooked. But I’ve had stares even from French folk, carrying it onto a TGV carriage; so I guess even the locals can be sensitive – or more likely more and more are losing their taste buds to supermarché ‘cuisine’.

      Though there’s an objective element to the washed-rind = stinky equation, odour can be subjective. My daughter at 5 diagnosed good Parmesan as having a whiff of vomit about it; by 7 or so she couldn’t get enough of the umame flavour!

      You can’t seriously suggest people cut the white off Camembert… The ammonia from it Brie etc only appears strongly when it is ripened too well. Anglophones tend to have ‘use by date’ syndrome when it comes to cheeses and buy and eat them way to young.

      From Australia, where the quarantine nazis restricted things like unpasteurised Roquefort…

    23. Peter says on February 12, 2014 at 3:22 am:

      What about Liederkranz? My father was from Bavaria and he would buy this cheese once in a while — much to my mother’s chagrin, because it would stink up the entire refrigerator. It was usually sold in a little wooden box, wrapped in a waxy paper. It had a soft, runny texture with a white rind. It was delicious, but boy did it stink!

    24. Donald Gudehus says on February 12, 2014 at 9:48 am:

      You forgot Parmesan cheese. To me it smells like vomit or a putrefying corpse. There was a Facebook group for people who hate it. On the other hand American Munster is acceptable.

    25. Rajesh says on March 23, 2014 at 1:27 am:

      Gagging over Appenzeller right now. Mainly because of the smell, which is like that of dead rat. Taste Is OK, its The smell that’s unbearable. Surprising its not in this list.

    26. Robert Waterfall says on May 30, 2014 at 8:45 am:

      Vieux Boulogne is the worlds stinkiest cheese. I have not as yet tried it but as they say ‘A faint heart never ****** a fair lady’ so will try it as soon as possible.

    Comments are closed.